470933 Assessment of the Exposure of Human Lung Epithelial Cells to Nanoclays

Monday, November 14, 2016
Grand Ballroom B (Hilton San Francisco Union Square)
Andrew White1, Todd Stueckle2, Rakesh K. Gupta3, Sushant Agarwal3, Alixandra Wagner4, Yon Rojanasakul5 and Cerasela Zoica Dinu3, (1)West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, (2)Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV, (3)Chemical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, (4)Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, (5)Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV

Assessment of the Exposure of Human Lung Epithelial Cells to Nanoclays

A. White1, A. Wagner1, R. Gupta1, S. Agarwal1, T. A. Stueckle2,3, Y. Rojanasakul3, C. Z. Dinu1

1. Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506

2. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505

3. Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506

Abstract:

Nanoclays are widely considered for applications in plastics industry. Due to their high biocompatibility and controllable surface properties, they are also often incorporated into polymers to form nanoclay-reinforced polymers, or nanocomposites, to be utilized for applications such as food packaging. However, their increased usage and eventual disposal is necessitating investigations into their relative toxicity. The proposed research aims to evaluate the interactions of such nanomaterials with human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) with such cells being used to mimic exposure by inhalation. To complete the experiments, we have investigated 4 Nanomer® clays’ (pristine and organically modified). Chemical and physical properties are assessed using microscopical and spectroscopical assays. Cellular dose responses were extrapolated from inhibitory concentration studies (e.g. live cell counts) and further developed into IC50values. Cellular viability assays were also employed to provide further insights into the mechanism of toxicity of these nanomaterials with respect to cellular fate. Geno- and cytotoxicity pathways are being currently established to further extrapolate the implications that exposure to such nanomaterials could have to workers in both manufacturing and industrial environments.

Disclaimer: The findings and conclusions in this abstract are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.


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See more of this Session: Poster Session: Nanoscale Science and Engineering
See more of this Group/Topical: Nanoscale Science and Engineering Forum