461196 Development of Highly Compatible and High-Performance Mixed Matrix Membranes for CO2 Separation

Thursday, November 17, 2016: 12:30 PM
Plaza B (Hilton San Francisco Union Square)
Zhi Wang, Xiaochang Cao, Zhihua Qiao, Jixiao Wang and Shichang Wang, Chemical Engineering Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China

Development of highly compatible and high-performance mixed matrix membranes for CO2 separation

Zhi Wang*, Xiaochang Cao, Zhihua Qiao, Jixiao Wang, Shichang Wang

Chemical Engineering Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350, PR China Tianjin Key Laboratory of Membrane Science and Desalination Technology, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350, PR China wangzhi@tju.edu.cn

*Corresponding author

Global energy and environmental problems create an urgent need for new and environmental friendly strategies that can be used to capture CO2 energy-efficiently. Membrane-based CO2 separation technology exhibits potential applications for greenhouse gas control (CO2 capture from flue gas) and clean energy supply (natural gas purification and hydrogen production). Currently, great efforts have been devoted to membranes that preferentially permeate CO2 with high permeances and selectivities for CO2/N2, CO2/CH4 and CO2/H2 gas pairs. Mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) offering a number of benefits, become one of the most popular membrane morphologies for efficient CO2 separation applications for the past few years. MMMs, consisting of organic polymers as the continuous phase and filler particles as the disperse phase, not only could circumvent the trade-off limit of the continuous phase as well as the inherent obstacles of brittleness associated with the disperse phase, but also could combine their advantages such as good processability of polymers and excellent gas separation property of fillers.

One of the critical factors that restrict achieving high separation performance of MMMs is the poor compatibility between the filler and polymer matrix leading to non-selective interface voids formation. To systematically explore polymer-filler interface and its influence, a series of MMMs have been fabricated by coating the mixture comprised of same polymer and different inorganic fillers. The size of interface voids is connected to the property of fillers1. Under the direction of this work, a series of nanofillers with good interface compatibility towards polymer chains and high permselectivity for CO2 separation have been synthesized and incorporated into polymers to fabricate highly compatible and high-performance MMMs by our group (presented in Fig. 1).

Polymeric nanofillers possess apparent favorable affinities toward polymer continuous phase based on the theory of similarity and intermiscibility. Two kinds of polymeric nanofillers have been designed. Polyaniline (PANI) nanorod2 containing amino carrier, constructs the CO2-facilitated transport highway in the MMM (presented in Fig. 1(a)). Covalent organic framework (COF)3 containing amino carrier, obtains CO2 preferential adsorption channels in the MMM (presented in Fig. 1(b)).

Coupling of polymer chains and nanofillers is an effective way to improve the interface compatibility between polymer continuous phase and coupled nanofillers. Therefore, our group has coupled hydrotalcite (HT)'s channels in a polyethyleneimine-epichlorohydrin copolymer (PEIE)4, in which contains abundant amino-groups and moderate hydroxyl groups, to establish high-speed CO2 facilitated transport channels in the MMM (presented in Fig. 1(c)).

The as-developed MMMs display outstanding CO2 separation performance.

(a)

(b)

(c)

Figure 1. Scheme illustration of highly compatible and high-performance MMMs for CO2 separation: (a) membrane with PANI nanorod; (b) membrane with COF; (c) membrane with HT-PEIE.

References (1)   Wang, M.; Wang, Z.;  Li, N.; Liao, J. Y.; Zhao, S.; Wang, J. X.; Wang, S. C. J. Membrane Sci. 2015, 495, 252. (2)      Zhao, S.; Wang, Z,; Qiao, Z. H.; Wei, X.; Zhang, C. X.; Wang, J. X.; Wang, S. C. J. Mater. Chem. A, 2013, 1,246. (3)      Cao, X. C.; Qiao, Z. H.; Wang, Z.; Zhao, S.; Li, P. Y.; Wang, J. X.; Wang, S. C. Int. J. Hydrogen Energy. 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhydene.2016.01.137. (4)      Liao, J. Y.; Wang, Z.; Gao, C. Y.; Li, S. C.; Qiao, Z. H.; Wang, M.; Zhao, S.; Xie, X. M.; Wang, J. X.; Wang, S. C. Chem. Sci. 2014, 5, 2843. ADDIN EN.REFLIST


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