455274 Frother Performance and Its Influence on Flotation Process

Thursday, November 17, 2016: 5:05 PM
Van Ness (Hilton San Francisco Union Square)
Yee Soong1, Fan Shi2, McMahan L. Gray3 and Yungchieh Lai2, (1)National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Office of Research and Development, Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA, Pittsburgh, PA, (2)National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA, (3)U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA

2016 AIChE Annual Meeting
November 13th - November 18th, 2016
Hilton San Francisco Union Square
California, CA

Abstract Submission

 

PROGRAM TOPIC:

Rare Earth Elements in Fossil Fuel Derived Solids and Liquids


 

Exact Title of Paper:

Frother performance and its influence on flotation process

 

Presenting Author: Yungchieh Lai

National Energy Technology Laboratory, Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA

Contact Information: Yungchieh.lai@netl.doe.gov

 

Co-Authors: Fan Shi

National Energy Technology Laboratory, Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA

Contact Information: Fan.Shi@netl.doe.gov

 

Co-Authors: Yee Soong

National Energy Technology Laboratory, Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA

Contact Information: Yee.Soong@netl.doe.gov

 

Co-Authors: McMahan Gray

National Energy Technology Laboratory, Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA

Contact Information: Mac.Gray@netl.doe.gov

 

 

Abstract:

Flotation process is an aqueous, efficient, inexpensive, and well-developed commercial technology and has been widely applied in a variety of industrial processes, including mineral processing and waste water treatments. The flotation process first generates gas bubbles within a solid-liquid or liquid-liquid suspensions. The gas bubbles then attach solid particles or immiscible liquid droplets and rise to top of the liquid surface. The floated solid particles or immiscible liquid droplets finally are skimmed off to achieve the separation purpose. As particles/immiscible droplets are hydrophobic, such as greases and oils, they are easily attachable to gas bubbles and can be separated by the flotation technology.

A successful flotation process is dependent on the probability of the collision between bubbles and particles or droplets. Gas holdup is the ratio of gas volume to liquid phase in a bubble device. The increase of gas holdup will increase the opportunities of contact and attachment between particles and gas bubbles and hence increase the flotation efficiency.

The mechanic agitated flotation cell is one of the major flotation devises available, and frothers is the key to generate high gas holdup in such devise. Currently, the flotation technology has been applied at very different conditions, such as ion-containing oily waste water for oil cleanup or low temperature area for mineral processing. The effectiveness of frothers therefore can be strongly influenced by these different flotation conditions.

Here, we report the performance of frothers in the mechanic agitated flotation cell. Four different types of frothers- commercial product F660, commercial product F672, 4-Methyl-2-pentanol, and 4-heptanol- were studied at different conditions for their gas holdup generation. We will discuss the changes of gas holdup with the changing conditions. Flotation tests for practical separations are planned for the coming future. The discussion for the correlation between the performance of frothers and the separation efficacy at different conditions will be included.


Extended Abstract: File Not Uploaded