437854 Deterministic Absolute Negative Mobility for Sub-Micrometer Bioparticle Separation

Monday, November 9, 2015: 3:15 PM
Ballroom E (Salt Palace Convention Center)
Alexandra Ros1, Jinghui Luo1, Katherine Muratore2 and Edgar Arriaga2, (1)Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, (2)University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

Deterministic Absolute Negative Mobility for sub-micrometer Bioparticle Separation

Jinghui Luo1, Katherine Muratore3, Edgar Arriaga2,3 & Alexandra Ros1

1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA.

2Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

3Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. (Alexandra.Ros@asu.edu)

Efficient particle separation in the micron- and submicron range is required for the various analytical challenges related to nanotechnology and microbiology. Here, we demonstrate a non-intuitive, yet efficient migration mechanism for µm- and sub-µm colloidal particles and organelles, taking advantage of particle transport in a nonlinear post array in a microfluidic device under the periodic action of electrokinetic and dielectrophoretic forces. We reveal regimes in which deterministic particle migration opposite to the average applied force occurs for a larger particle – a typical signature of deterministic absolute negative mobility (dANM) -whereas normal response is obtained for smaller particles. The coexistence of dANM and normal migration was characterized and optimized in numerical modeling and subsequently implemented in a microfluidic device demonstrating at least two orders of magnitude higher migration speeds as compared to previous ANM systems. We could also induce dANM for mouse liver mitochondria and envision that the efficient size selectivity can be advantageously employed in organelle sub-population studies, for nanotechnological applications, or in fractionating protein nanocrystals.


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