387819 Packings and Assemblies for Continuous Families of Polyhedra

Wednesday, November 19, 2014: 2:45 PM
208 (Hilton Atlanta)
Daphne Klotsa1,2, Elizabeth R. Chen3, Michael Engel4, Pablo F. Damasceno5 and Sharon C. Glotzer4,6,7,8, (1)Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, (2)Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, (3)School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, (4)Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, (5)Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, (6)Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, (7)Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, (8)Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Nanoparticles and colloids of various polyhedral shapes are synthesized and used as building blocks for self-assembly. It has been shown in simulations that a plethora of complex crystals (including quasicrystals) can form entropically solely due to the anisotropic shape of the particles. At the limit of maximum density, the densest packings, as have been studied in math for centuries, becomes the relevant quantity. However, a general understanding of how changes in shape affect packings and assemblies remains largely unexplored. In this talk, we study continuous families of polyhedra to demonstrate richness and complexity in behavior as a function of shape. We investigate connections between assemblies and densest packings, discuss the possibility of predicting one from the other and outline general guidelines for experiments.

Extended Abstract: File Not Uploaded