283847 Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Activation of Plastics for Improved Adhesion

Tuesday, October 30, 2012: 2:20 PM
320 (Convention Center )
Robert F. Hicks, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, Thomas S. Williams, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Department, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, Hang Yu, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA and Eleazar Gonzalez II, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

AIChE Abstract 2012 Text

The adhesion of bonded joints is of great concern to the aerospace, automotive, medical device, and electronics industries.  We have developed a new method of preparing polymers and composite surfaces for bonding using low-temperature, atmospheric pressure plasmas.  This is a promising technique for replacing traditional methods of surface preparation by abrasion.  The plasma source generates an afterglow containing up to 1.0 volume% oxygen atoms.  The reactive gas rapidly activates the plastic surfaces, such that when bonded and cured with epoxy adhesives, they undergo 100% cohesive failure.  The strength of the bonded joints is increased by over 50% from that obtained from materials activated by solvent abrasion.  Carboxylic acid groups formed on the polymer surface appear to be responsible for the strength enhancement.  This work is a great example of how the methods taught by Professor Alex Bell may be used to engineer surfaces for enhanced performance.


Extended Abstract: File Not Uploaded
See more of this Session: In Honor of Alexis Bell's 70th Birthday II
See more of this Group/Topical: Catalysis and Reaction Engineering Division