274267 Cerium-Containing HZSM-5 Catalysts for Biomass Upgrading

Tuesday, October 30, 2012: 12:50 PM
315 (Convention Center )
Gregory T. Neumann, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN and Jason C. Hicks, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN

Cerium-Containing HZSM-5 Catalysts for Biomass Upgrading

Gregory T. Neumann, and Jason C. Hicks*

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, IN

Lignocellulosic biomass has been widely studied as a renewable source for the sustainable production of chemicals and fuels.1,2 Catalytic fast pyrolysis, a scalable, thermochemical process, has received particular attention as a method to upgrade lignocellulosic biomass directly to chemicals and fuels. We report the synthesis, characterization, and glucose catalytic fast pyrolysis results of HZSM-5 catalysts modified through the addition of cerium.  Cerium was incorporated in the HZSM-5 materials using three different methods: 1) incipient wetness, 2) ion-exchange, and 3) incorporation in the dry gel.3 Interestingly, of the three materials studied for the catalytic fast pyrolysis of glucose, only the dry gel, cerium incorporated catalyst significantly altered the product distribution.3 With this catalyst, the production of benzene, toluene and xylenes decreased, while production of furans, aldehydes, and ketones increased.

It was also found that the cerium-containing, dry gel catalyst could stabilize pyrolysis oils through decarbonylation and ketonization reactions.  For instance, the cerium incorporated dry gel HZSM-5 catalyst enhanced the decarbonylation reaction pathway of furfural to produce CO and furan.4 Another component of pyrolysis-oil is acetic acid. We have shown that the cerium incorporated dry gel HZSM-5 catalyst has the ability to couple acetic acid to selectively produce acetone through a ketonization reaction pathway.  These materials have been characterized by N2 physisorption, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), diffuse reflectance UV-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance FT-IR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ammonia temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD), and combination focused ion beam (FIB)/ SEM.  

1.         Hicks, J. C., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2011, 2 (18), 2280-2287.

2.         Huber, G. W.; Iborra, S.; Corma, A., Chem. Rev. 2006, 106 (9), 4044-4098.

3.         Neumann, G. T.; Hicks, J. C., ACS Catal. 2012, 642-646.

4.         Neumann, G. T.; Hicks, J. C., Top. Catal. 2012, 55 (3-4), 196-208.


Extended Abstract: File Not Uploaded