272254 Effect of Particle Size On Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Pretreated Miscanthus

Wednesday, October 31, 2012
Hall B (Convention Center )
Esha Khullar1, Bruce S. Dien2, Kent D. Rausch1, M. E. Tumbleson1 and Vijay Singh1, (1)Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, (2)Bioenergy Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, USDA-ARS, Peoria, IL

Effect of Particle Size on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Pretreated Miscanthus

Esha Khullar1, Bruce S. Dien2, Kent D. Rausch1, M. E. Tumbleson1 and Vijay Singh1*

1University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801

(217-333-9510) vsingh@uiuc.edu and 2National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, ARS, USDA, Peoria, IL 61604

The effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus x giganteus was determined.  Miscanthus was ground using a hammer mill equipped with screens having 0.08, 2.0 or 6.0 mm sieve openings.  Particle size distribution and geometric mean diameters were determined for all samples.  Ground samples were subjected to hot water, dilute acid or dilute ammonium hydroxide pretreatment.  Enzyme hydrolysis was conducted on washed pretreated solids; sugar generation was used as a measure for pretreatment efficiency.  Glucose and xylose concentrations were monitored using HPLC.  Glucose and xylose profiles were generated and hydrolysis rates estimated.  Glucan, xylan and total conversion yields were determined by comparing final sugar concentrations obtained to theoretical amounts present in raw biomass. 

Geometric mean diameters were the smallest from 0.08 mm sieve screen (56 μm) followed by 2.0 mm (301 μm) and 6.0 mm (695 μm) screens.  Across all pretreatments, an increase in total polysaccharide conversion (12 to 26%) was observed when particle size was decreased from 6.0 mm to 0.08 mm.  Enzyme hydrolysis of unpretreated biomass samples also resulted in increased total conversions as particle size decreased, although mean conversions (10 to 20%) were much lower than for pretreated biomass samples (40 to 70%), indicating the need for chemical pretreatments in biomass conversion.


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